Posted by: Naomi | September 11, 2011

The English Patient

  Coming Soon

Posted by: Naomi | September 11, 2011

Little Children

  Coming Soon

Posted by: Naomi | September 11, 2011

On Chesil Beach

  Coming Soon

Posted by: Naomi | August 23, 2011

The Great Divorce

Coming Soon

Posted by: Naomi | August 8, 2011

The Joy Luck Club

Coming Soon

Posted by: Naomi | August 8, 2011

The Bonesetter’s Daughter

Coming Soon

Posted by: Naomi | July 15, 2011

Lolita

Coming Soon

Posted by: Naomi | July 11, 2011

The Godfather

When compared to some of the classics of literature, Mario Puzo’s The Godfather is hardly a smooth flowing epic, but it is a classic nonethless; a visceral, graphic portrayal of a Mafia family through several generations. I first encountered this book during high school, but reading it a decade later with fresh eyes, I found it to be an exciting and brilliantly developed story. I love the themes of family, honor, revenge, duty, and the pursuit of true satisfaction in life. The characters are vivid and three-dimensional, which lends an air of stark realism to the book. The films are also masterpieces in their own right, but to actually read the story is to be thrilled. I am fascinated by the dichotomy that exists with many of the characters within the Corleone family, particularly Michael and Don Vito. These men would gladly live in peace and prosperity, however, their own pride and personal sense of justice and responsibility pushes them to aid with the affairs of their fellow man, and to bring justice–however brutal–to those whom traditional justice has failed. It is a richly layered and amazing story.

Posted by: Naomi | July 6, 2011

The Reader

Bernhard Schlink’s  novel, Der Vorleser is a small book, I expected it to be a quick and easy read. It is a wonderful example of how a tale can be told well and concisely, and still be brimming with almost tangible examples of reality and the human experience. It is the story of an illicit relationship with Michael, a fifteen year old student, and Hanna, a 36 year old streetcar conductor, who initiates him into an adult relationship. He spends hours reading to her, various works that he is studying, to her enjoyment. The relationship dissolves, and each goes their separate way, until Michael sees Hanna at a war crimes trial, where she is one of the defendants, as a former prison guard. The book touches on the themes of illiteracy, relationships, the impact people can have in our lives, and the generations of Germans who have to live with the consequences from the people that have gone before them. Literacy is something that weighs heavily on me, I think it is a privilege, and the responsibility of everyone to make sure the whole world can read. This is a wrenching and amazing book.

Posted by: Naomi | July 4, 2011

The Virgin Suicides

When I discovered the novel Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides, I was immediately touched by his writing style and penchant for dark humor and exploring family secrets. I was deeply moved by his debut novel, The Virgin Suicides. I empathized strongly with the elements of sisterhood, family control, legalistic expectations, and the desperation to own something in your life, something that is wholly yours. I enjoyed the unusual way that the story was told, by a group of narrators that had become enchanted by the Lisbon girls when they were boys, and think often of them still, as grown men. The five sisters who committed suicide in the space of roughly a year tugged at my mind, plucking familiar strings and causing me to think–at times–that perhaps they were braver than I, when I was struggling with similar things. Although life is enjoyable and precious, the Lisbon sisters are viewed as too ethereal and unusual to be bound to this mortal earth. The boys came to save them, and would have gladly done so, but the girls chose what they felt was the best thing for them to do. No one has ever gotten over it.

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